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Thread: Forks jump when braking

  1. #21
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    Im not a bearing "ologist" so I wanted confirmation as to what I had found before pulling the trigger. Thanks for the help.
    MY BIKES..1977 GS 750 B, 1978 GS 1000 C(X2)
    1978 GS 1000 E, 1979 GS 1000 S, 1973 Yamaha TX 750, 1977 Kawasaki KZ 650B1, 1975 Honda GL1000 Goldwing, 1983 CB 650SC Nighthawk, 1972 Honda CB 350K4, 74 Honda CB550

    NEVER SNEAK UP ON A SLEEPING DOG..NOT EVEN YOUR OWN.


    I would rather trust my bike to a "QUACK" that KNOWS how to fix it rather than a book worm that THINKS HE KNOWS how to fix it.

  2. #22
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    Aug 2015
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    Lol...me neither...I just know that if the cycle shops open bearings cost twice as much as the better sealed bearings....and I happen to know the measurements so I can search...I'd go the cheaper route.
    Dealerships have to mark things up to cover operating costs.
    Web stores in this day and age make this event less painful, cost wise.
    '80 GS850G {13K}
    '80 GS1000G {30K}
    '40 Plymouth touring - wife calls her my other wife{79k...leaks oil, but she's got great curves}
    '08 Avalon - DD/cage{166k...doesn't burn or leak oil}

  3. #23
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    I'm just tossing this out for anyone to use, but as I recall then, and would still do today, is this-
    The service manager at the old cycle shop once told me how to do this;
    -bike on center stand, prop up front end under the engine block with a piece of wood {I used a section of 2x4} so the front wheel is in the air, remove caliper{s} for total free wheeling and no brake drag, spin wheel and mark with a piece of tape where it stops...spin again and look for the wheel to not stop in the same spots {bad bearings}. When the wheel is up, get a buddy to hold the cycle while you grab the wheel and try to twist it {one hand top and the other bottom}...your looking for lateral movement. This is a good time to check steering head movement too and even easier if you remove the wheel.....

    When all done and the rear wheel is up {alot easier on chain drive bikes} get a buddy to hold the bike while you try twisting the swing arm side to side...loose swing arm bearings/bushings check
    '80 GS850G {13K}
    '80 GS1000G {30K}
    '40 Plymouth touring - wife calls her my other wife{79k...leaks oil, but she's got great curves}
    '08 Avalon - DD/cage{166k...doesn't burn or leak oil}

  4. #24
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    JJ is offline Forum LongTimer Past Bard Award Winner
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck hahn View Post
    Only thing I found was the wheel bearing felt just a tad notchy ( just enough to actually feel it ) when my pinkey finger rolled them round. Next I stuck the axle in and moved up and down and could actually visually observe movement of the inner race in relation to the rubber dust seals.

    So, My conclusion is that when i apply the brake the jitterings because of wheel bearing headed south. Sound about right???
    Sounds reasonable to me.
    Johnny

    Artificial Intelligence is no match for natural stupidity. (AKA Trump voters...)

    '82 GS1100GK - Max
    '83 GS850G - Minnie
    '83 Yamaha XJ650 Maxim

  5. #25
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    Dont know if it was the new bearings or the new brake lines ( had new ones made at Central Oklahoma Hose ) but the situation is resolved.
    MY BIKES..1977 GS 750 B, 1978 GS 1000 C(X2)
    1978 GS 1000 E, 1979 GS 1000 S, 1973 Yamaha TX 750, 1977 Kawasaki KZ 650B1, 1975 Honda GL1000 Goldwing, 1983 CB 650SC Nighthawk, 1972 Honda CB 350K4, 74 Honda CB550

    NEVER SNEAK UP ON A SLEEPING DOG..NOT EVEN YOUR OWN.


    I would rather trust my bike to a "QUACK" that KNOWS how to fix it rather than a book worm that THINKS HE KNOWS how to fix it.

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