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Collins_Hydroblast
11-30-2018, 03:47 PM
Hey Gang,

My name is Max Collins. I own and operate Collins Hydroblast Technique, LLC, a wet blasting operation in northeastern Connecticut. I specialize in treating vintage Japanese motorcycle parts for restoration professionals, enthusiasts, and weekend warriors.

I am new to the GS Resources forum, but I am certainly not new to GS bikes. The whole reason I got into wet blasting was because I was restoring my 1981 GS850G and I couldn't find anybody in my immediate area to wet-blast the parts. So I bought my own blast cabinet and got to work.

Please check out my website at www.collinshydroblast.com (http://www.collinshydroblast.com) for more details, pictures and contact information regarding my business.

Thanks for reading!

-Max

Collins_Hydroblast
11-30-2018, 06:45 PM
Thanks you, isleoman!

It’s a bummer to hear about your chemical-cleaning woes, I wish we had connected sooner!

Good call about explaining the advantages of wet media blasting as opposed to dry media blasting, here goes:

1) Wet media blasting does not mar or impregnate the surface with media (whereas glass bead WILL mar and impregnate the surface, leaving behind trace amounts of media even after thorough cleaning). This makes it not only a one-step cleaning/finishing process but it also means that wet media blasting is safe to use on ALL internal engine parts.

2) As stated above, once a piece is treated in the wet blast cabinet it does not need to be “finished.” The wet blasting process leaves the part in a handsome matte finish that is ready to bolt back on and enjoy.

3) As an added benefit, wet-blasting seals, shot-peens and stress relieves the surface of the metal on the part, making it stronger and more resistant to damage than before.

4) As far as labor hours are concerned, there is no quicker way to restore parts to their prior glory. I can blast an entire 2-cylinder engine in 8-10 hours at an approximate cost of $600 (true cost depends on many factors). Meanwhile, it would take a restoration enthusiast countless hours with wire brushes, chemicals or other methods to do the same engine, and I am willing to predict that the results would be far less desirable than those of the wet blast process.

Thanks again, isleoman! Let me know when you are working on your next project if I can be of any service!

-Max

storm 64
11-30-2018, 07:27 PM
Hi Max, welcome to the site. Question, So if you Vapor Blast a cylinder head, valve cover and cylinders. You will not have to paint them? They will retrain the "fresh" glass bead finish? I bet it does a nice job on carburetor bodies. 👍

Collins_Hydroblast
12-09-2018, 10:57 PM
Hi Max, welcome to the site. Question, So if you Vapor Blast a cylinder head, valve cover and cylinders. You will not have to paint them? They will retrain the "fresh" glass bead finish? I bet it does a nice job on carburetor bodies. 👍

Hi Storm 64,

Thanks for the warm welcome, and I apologize profusely for the huge delay in getting back to you, I've been out of town visiting family. To answer your questions:

1) If a cylinder head, valve cover and cylinders are vapor blasted, the finish will definitely hold up to moderate use (especially if the bike is stored in a climate controlled environment). If the bike were to see heavy-duty use under extreme riding conditions, I would suggest having the parts powder-coated with a semi-gloss clear powder. The semi-gloss clear powder would preserve the finish that the vapor-blasting produced without "over shining" it. (On a side note, my vapor blasting equipment is set up IN a powdercoat shop, so I can take care of the whole process)

2) It does a FANTASTIC job on carburetor bodies!

Thanks for your questions and I apologize again for taking so long to get back to you.

-Max Collins