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    Headlight switch loop

    Just ordered an SH775 and looking at the site was wondering what is the deal with the headlight loop bypass because I don't have my schematic to look at and I just read about it being deleted but was wondering the reason for it? Probably obvious

    #2
    Read the “my charging system” thread linked in my signature.

    Rich -1982 GS 750TZ
    BikeCliff's Website / Charging system quick test / My charging system sorted / Using Imgur/Flickr-post #6 / Top 10 Newbie Mistakes / Destroy-rebuild 750T

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      #3
      Originally posted by Shaneh View Post
      Just ordered an SH775 and looking at the site was wondering what is the deal with the headlight loop bypass because I don't have my schematic to look at and I just read about it being deleted but was wondering the reason for it? Probably obvious
      Rich has all the information, but it's going to take a while to read his (rather detailed) report. In a nutshell:
      Back when it was legal to turn off the headlight, Suzuki ran one leg of the stator through a second set of contacts in the headlight switch. When you turned the light off, you also eliminated one-third of the charging capacity, keeping everything happy. Starting with the 1980 models, the switch was either locked in place or removed completely (on the US models), but the main wiring harness was not changed because the rest of the world still had that option.

      If you follow the wires on a stock stator, there is a white/green wire that has a connector in it, then disappears into the harness. After going up, under the tank, there is another connector. On the non-US bikes, it then goes to the headlight switch and back to the connector. On the US bikes, it simply loops back to the connector. From the connector, it goes back down, near the stator and shows up as a white/red wire. It then goes through another connector and goes to the Rectifier/Regulator (R/R).

      Look at a wiring diagram and count the connectors. Now realize that for every connector, there are actually three interfaces where corroion can form. 1. from the copper wire to the brass terminal. 2. from one brass terminal to the other terminal. 3. from the brass terminal to the next copper wire. There is a total of about 12 interfaces (four connectors) in the stock system. Eliminating the headlight loop cuts that down to three, greatly improving the chance that you have a system that performs better.

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