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Thread: The Next Nerobro's HowTo: Doing the Stator Dance

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
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    Chicagoland
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    2,011

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    There go the sidecovers, the tank, and suddenly the bike doesn't look so stately anymore. Poor GS. Beneath the cable tires on the center tubes, you can see the junction where the stator makes it's connection to the wiring harness. Honestly I don't like the setup much. 20amps go up some fine wires to those connections, then down the wiring harness, and under the battery, and up behind the battery, to the r/r. I'm going to be moving the r/r to somwhere it'll get airflow.. soon.

    Skreemer, working on getting into the stator cover. He'd already gotten the starter cover off. The bike is leaning on the doorjam. By leaning the bike over you can gain access without having to drain the oil. I put the bike in first before I leaned it over so it is being held in place.

    Can you guess where the stator wires go?

    Can you guess now? The big thing on the end of the crankshaft is the rotor. The "misplaced" gear is the reduction gear for the starter. The shaft it normally rides on is still stuck in the stator cover. This is where we discovered that this bike has had it's stator replaced before.
    Last edited by Nerobro; 10-21-2006 at 07:04 PM.
    You'd have to be crazy to be sane in this world -Nero
    If you love it, let it go. If it comes back....... You probably highsided.
    1980 GS550E (I swear it's a 550...)
    1982 GS650E (really, it's a 650)
    1983 GS550ES (42mpg again)
    1996 Yamaha WR250 (No, it's not a 4 stroke.)
    1971 Yamaha LT2 (9 horsepower of FURY.)

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    2,011

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    The stock fasteners for the stator are Phillips head screws. Those, are not, Phillips head. The retaining clip is also an allen head, and that too is supposed to be a Phillips head screw. So along with being on at least it's third r/r, this will be at least it's third stator. Speaking of which, you can really see the damage on that stator. I blame it's condition on a failed gsxr r/r that I installed on the bike. There are certain r/r failures that are very hard to bench test, and I obviously missed a shot SCR. I'll be doing an autopsy on it later.

    Though you can't read the numbers on that DVM, it's reading 90 volts. Which is certainly acceptable. At least it's better than the 45 I was getting before. That means I succeeded.


    We put an hours worth of riding on the bike today. The solder joints are holding, and the battery is charging to 13.3 volts. Which is acceptable.

    Yet another home spun fix. That appears successful.
    Last edited by Nerobro; 10-21-2006 at 07:02 PM.
    You'd have to be crazy to be sane in this world -Nero
    If you love it, let it go. If it comes back....... You probably highsided.
    1980 GS550E (I swear it's a 550...)
    1982 GS650E (really, it's a 650)
    1983 GS550ES (42mpg again)
    1996 Yamaha WR250 (No, it's not a 4 stroke.)
    1971 Yamaha LT2 (9 horsepower of FURY.)

  3. #23
    cberkeley Guest

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    Excellent ....way to go!

  4. #24
    Boondocks Guest

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    Very nice work competently performed, Nerobro.

    This info and pictures will be very useful for those that want to rewind their own stators. This would make a very good addition to the stator papers.

  5. #25
    80gs1000e Guest

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nerobro View Post

    Yup, I did this all at my desk at work. On the clock...
    ......

  6. #26
    HammerHead Guest

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    An Awesome feat.
    Definitely a tread that we will all be comming back to time and time again. Thanks to individuals like yourself, this forum ROCKS!!!

  7. #27
    skreemer Guest

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    as a little end to the tale we ran the bike around for a bit in a parking lot... Everything worked like a charm.

    We also took our new roommate out to the parking lot and gave him his first taste of motorcycle riding with some clutch exercises.

  8. #28
    maclariz Guest

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    Just wondering. Did you use any coating / epoxy or not? How is the stator holding up after some use? Just about to embark on rewiring my GS400 stator.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2004
    Location
    Chicagoland
    Posts
    2,011

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    It's still working great. :-) The bike charges like it should. I didn't coat it with epoxy, as epoxy will just insulate the windings. I did however wind them very tightly to minimize any movement.
    You'd have to be crazy to be sane in this world -Nero
    If you love it, let it go. If it comes back....... You probably highsided.
    1980 GS550E (I swear it's a 550...)
    1982 GS650E (really, it's a 650)
    1983 GS550ES (42mpg again)
    1996 Yamaha WR250 (No, it's not a 4 stroke.)
    1971 Yamaha LT2 (9 horsepower of FURY.)

  10. #30
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    312

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    Nice set of photos. This will make the project much more approachable for many.

    Three thoughts:

    1) The rewind shop that helped me said that baked varnish over the winds stopped vibration-chafe failures on the wire.


    2) Over the crimped, not soldered joints, I used fiberglass insulation spaghetti stripped from high-temp wire, available at a hardware store. It gets hot in there!

    3) I made a tensioning clamp out of two blocks of oak bolted together. A shallow groove carved in the block made sure the wire didn't chafe on the bolts. This let me put full tension on the wire without cutting a groove in my fingers.

    MF
    Mark Fisher

    ..............................27 years

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