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Thread: Tip on how to "easily" get your carb rack back into the boots

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    Default Tip on how to "easily" get your carb rack back into the boots

    If you've taken the carbs off your bike, you know getting them back into the boots can be very difficult. Today when I went to return my freshly cleaned carbs to the bike I decided I was going to work smarter, not harder. To use this trick you will need a 4x4 slightly longer than your carb gang, a short section of 2x4 (mine was about 2'), a rubber mallet, and a rachet strap. It doesn't need to be heavy duty, I used one with 400 lbs max pulling force. You will place the 2x4 across the front of your frame, to distribute weight evenly, the 4x4 goes across the back of your carbs, the rachet strap goes around all of this. I racheted it up tight, but not overly so, once the slack was out I racheted it twice. This will hold the carbs in position, as you gently tap the back of the 4x4 with the rubber mallet to get the carbs to seat. In the past I've struggled for nearly an hour trying to get the carbs back on the bike; today, I was done in 5 minutes. Some might think using the frame as an anchor point is a poor idea, but IMO this was even less stress than strapping the bike down for transport would put on the frame. Would love to hear your feedback, or other tips to make reinstalling the carbs easier.
    1982 GS850GL - Shaved seat foam and new seat cover; Daytona handlebars and Tusk risers; Puig "Naked" Windscreen\
    1978 KZ200 - Mostly original, hydraulic front brake swap, superbike bars; purchased at 7k original miles
    Track bike project: 2008 Hyosung frame w/ 97 gs500E engine swap (in progress)

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    Burque73's Avatar
    Burque73 is offline Forum Sage Past Site Supporter
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    I throw a leg over and sit on the frame, above the battery. Feet on the pegs grab carbs on left and right and wiggle into the boots. A little silicone grease helps things slide together.
    Roger

    1983 GS 850G
    2003 FJR 1300A



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    And then how do you get the airbox in?

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    Didn't know they had 2x4s in Japan, or even 4x4s wow…
    "Only fe' collected the old way, has any value." from His Majesty O'Keefe (1954 film)
    1982 GS1100G- road bike, body, seat and suspension modded
    1990 GSX750F-(1127cc '92 GSXR engine) track bike, much re-engineered
    1987 Honda CBR600F Hurricane; hooligan bike, restored

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharpy View Post
    And then how do you get the airbox in?
    On the big shafties, you just put it in. If it's difficult, you need new rubber.

    Like Burkue73, I sit on the bike to install the carbs. Once I get 1 or 4 in, the rest follow more easily. Sometimes I scooch back and push with my feet once I get them aligned. Rocking them up and down helps a lot too. I never remember to try lube. If you don't have the strength you want, or the intake boots are marginal, the ratchet strap might be a good trick to keep handy.
    Last edited by Dogma; 03-02-2019 at 07:22 PM.
    Dogma
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogma View Post
    On the big shafties, you just put it in. If it's difficult, you need new rubber.

    Like Burkue73, I sit on the bike to install the carbs. Once I get 1 or 4 in, the rest follow more easily. Sometimes I scooch back and push with my feet once I get them aligned. Rocking them up and down helps a lot too. I never remember to try lube. If you don't have the strength you want, or the intake boots are marginal, the ratchet strap might be a good trick to keep handy.
    My boots are probably marginal, but they don't have any airleaks or cracks yet so I'm going to keep running them. And I don't have the strength I would probably need to get them in by hand, so using the rachet straps was pretty much my only option.
    1982 GS850GL - Shaved seat foam and new seat cover; Daytona handlebars and Tusk risers; Puig "Naked" Windscreen\
    1978 KZ200 - Mostly original, hydraulic front brake swap, superbike bars; purchased at 7k original miles
    Track bike project: 2008 Hyosung frame w/ 97 gs500E engine swap (in progress)

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    so air box slides in after the carbs are fitted on shafties?

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    Quote Originally Posted by sharpy View Post
    so air box slides in after the carbs are fitted on shafties?
    That's correct.
    1982 GS850GL - Shaved seat foam and new seat cover; Daytona handlebars and Tusk risers; Puig "Naked" Windscreen\
    1978 KZ200 - Mostly original, hydraulic front brake swap, superbike bars; purchased at 7k original miles
    Track bike project: 2008 Hyosung frame w/ 97 gs500E engine swap (in progress)

  9. #9
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    If you have to go with that palaver you definitely need new rubbers.
    The big guy up there rides a Suzuki (this I know)
    1981 gs850gx

    1999 RF900
    past bikes. RF900
    TL1000s
    Hayabusa
    gsx 750f x2
    197cc Francis Barnett
    various British nails

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    Gorminrider is offline Forum Sage Past Site Supporter
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    Heat softens old rubber...use heatgun (not too hot!) or even rags from hot water...(wear gloves-"hot" hurts! again, rubber needn't be boiling hot)
    a bit of greasy stuff is a help.

    You might even try soapy water or tire-lube (used to mount tubeless tires)
    BUT
    Danger-If you force carbs onto old, cold rubber with levers or ratchets, you will risk tearing that ridge off that matches the groove on your carb mouths...you needn't ask how I know this
    Last edited by Gorminrider; 03-03-2019 at 01:50 PM.

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