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Thread: torque spec/tips on valve gasket and some extra questions

  1. #1
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    Default torque spec/tips on valve gasket and some extra questions

    what are the torque specs ( or recommended spec by you) for the breather valve gasket, the valve cover gasket, and the oil pan gasket. with getting the old gasket off the oil-pan, id say a knife is impractical, is there a good method to not damage the metal from your pan?
    Ian

    1982 GS650GLZ

    Want a "twin" for my bike

  2. #2
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    M6 x 1.0 bolts in aluminum are specified at 6.0 - 7.5 lb.-ft. of torque.

    .

    mine: 2000 Honda GoldWing GL1500SE and 1980 GS850G'K' "Junior"
    hers: 1982 GS850GL - "Angel" and 1969 Suzuki T250 Scrambler
    #1 son: 1986 Yamaha Venture Royale 1300 and 1982 GS650GL "Rat Bagger"
    #2 son: 1980 GS1000G
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    Want a copy of my valve adjust spreadsheet for your 2-valve per cylinder engine? Send me an e-mail request (not a PM)
    (Click on my username in the upper-left corner for e-mail info.)

  3. #3
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    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    works wonders for removing gasket material with a die grinder.

  4. #4
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    If you're going to use a torque wrench to put your valve cover back on, you're going to want one calibrated in in-lb (or lb-in depending on who you ask). Multiply the ft-lb torque spec from your service manual (you have one, right?) x 12 to get in-lb.

    The advice I was given when I did my first valve clearance on my bike was that it takes less force than you would think, it's a "feel" thing. Well, having never done it before, I don't have a "feel" for it. So I bought and used an in-lb torque wrench for @$50 on amazon. I still tightened the darn thing too much, twice, and ruined 2 gaskets. At @$40 a gasket, those were kind of expensive mistakes on my part.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich82GS750TZ View Post
    The advice I was given when I did my first valve clearance on my bike was that it takes less force than you would think, it's a "feel" thing. Well, having never done it before, I don't have a "feel" for it. So I bought and used an in-lb torque wrench for @$50 on amazon. I still tightened the darn thing too much, twice, and ruined 2 gaskets. At @$40 a gasket, those were kind of expensive mistakes on my part.
    Be thankful you only ruined the gaskets ... i think it is a "feel" thing.
    The tired threads in the aluminium cannot take what they used to,
    so tightening to spec will ruin threads every so often.
    Increasing problems is trying to be nice to the bike by putting a dab of
    lubricant on the bolts.
    These were meant to be installed dry.
    (i like lubricant on them, must be from working on 2-strokes)

    The torque specs take into account the friction the mating thread surfaces
    create and lubricant reduces that friction by a huge amount like 30% or so.
    So torqueing a lubricated bolt with correct torque into a tired thread
    will result in a stripped hole .... many times.

    I always run a tap through these to clean up the threads.
    And then a bolt, to try and feel the thread for hickups or play.
    If i cannot easily run the bolt in with 2 fingers all the way, usually
    that means it's time to break out the helicoils.
    This reduces, not eliminates, the number of stripped threads.

    Remember, the only thing all those bolts have to do is keep the parts
    from falling off the bike and put just enough pressure on the gasket
    to stop leaks.

  6. #6
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    +1 on low-end torque specs for the valve cover
    1983 GS 1100 ESD

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rijko View Post
    Increasing problems is trying to be nice to the bike by putting a dab of
    lubricant on the bolts.
    I didn't lube the bolts when I installed the cover, but I did follow a bunch of peoples advise and greased the gasket (for easy removal and possible re-use next valve adjustment). I don't think that helped me. The third time, the time that I didn't squish and tear the gasket, I put it on dry (I believe it was Steve that suggested that, if memory serves.) I plan on sticking to regular valve adjustment intervals (don't remember off the top of my head what that is) so time/miles will tell if the gasket sticks and breaks or comes off clean. Either way, I don't think I would trust re-using it.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rich82GS750TZ View Post
    I didn't lube the bolts when I installed the cover, but I did follow a bunch of peoples advise and greased the gasket (for easy removal and possible re-use next valve adjustment). I don't think that helped me. The third time, the time that I didn't squish and tear the gasket, I put it on dry (I believe it was Steve that suggested that, if memory serves.) I plan on sticking to regular valve adjustment intervals (don't remember off the top of my head what that is) so time/miles will tell if the gasket sticks and breaks or comes off clean. Either way, I don't think I would trust re-using it.
    yeah .. those come up with arguments about cost, re-use and lots of good
    experiences with the grease method.
    I have nothing against that, but i install them dry with monotonous success
    As for cost .. for the price of a new fresh valve cover gasket i like to
    use a new one and reduce the chance of having to pull the cover and replace
    if it fails... and i'm Dutch

  9. #9
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    “The tired threads in the aluminium cannot take what they used to,
    so tightening to spec will ruin threads every so often.”

    This happened to me this valve check time...fortunately a longer bolt grabbed some new aluminum
    1981 gs650L

    "We are all born ignorant, but you have to work hard to stay stupid" Ben Franklin

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tom203 View Post
    “The tired threads in the aluminium cannot take what they used to,
    so tightening to spec will ruin threads every so often.”

    This happened to me this valve check time...fortunately a longer bolt grabbed some new aluminum
    You will probably strip that thread next time.

    This is what i fondly think of as yin/yang and the "PO rant origin".
    Our collective experience tells/learns us to accept some practices
    Suzuki and a lot of mechanics would frown on.

    I keep a log on all my bikes and have done the same thing,
    but will record in the log that i will need to place a helicoil next time.

    Lazy maybe, but if it holds without leaking it's good enough sometimes
    and it saves a lot of time.
    Should i sell the bike (the one in my avatar - will NOT ever sell it if not
    absolutely necessary), the next owner will probably rant about me
    because he strips the thread immediately.

    oh well, come on and flame me for not doing it right every time
    I accept and respect that, it's just sometimes i do not have or want to spend the time.

    Last time that happened to me, i was preparing the bike for a trip to the UK
    the next day. "everything" worked against me and the last bolt i
    tightened on that *(&*&^% cam cover stripped.
    A longer bolt grabbed enough flesh to feel tight enough and it is still ok.
    At 3 AM, having to leave at 9, i just had enough. Good enough is good enough.

    BTW a guy like Steve who does this professionally and *really* knows his stuff
    is someone to listen to.

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