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Thread: New Engine Break In Procedure

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by chuck hahn View Post
    "We asked four top engine builders..."

    Unarmed engine builders. Probably not Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki or Yamaha. Those are my four top engine builders.

    And in any case, the article mentions brief high rpm runs. Not "ride it like you stole it."
    1982 GS1100E V&H "SS" exhaust, APE pods, 1150 oil cooler, 140 speedo, 99.3 rear wheel HP, black engine, '83 red

    2016 XL883L Two-tone blue and white. Almost 42 hp! Status: destroyed, now owned by the insurance company. The hole in my memory starts an hour before the accident and ends 24 hours after.

  2. #12
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    lol, as you can see, it probably doesn't matter much.....
    1983 GS 1100 ESD

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by greg78gs750 View Post
    lol, as you can see, it probably doesn't matter much.....
    Hey! My Sportster was properly broken in. Until it got broken in two.
    1982 GS1100E V&H "SS" exhaust, APE pods, 1150 oil cooler, 140 speedo, 99.3 rear wheel HP, black engine, '83 red

    2016 XL883L Two-tone blue and white. Almost 42 hp! Status: destroyed, now owned by the insurance company. The hole in my memory starts an hour before the accident and ends 24 hours after.

  4. #14
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    Nessism is offline Forum LongTimer GSResource Superstar
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    Car manufacturers don't typically specify a break-in procedure and most auto engines manage to run just fine regardless of how the customer drives the car from new. No doubt they have learned that it does not matter much what type of break-in is performed.

    And for what it's worth, at the auto plant that I worked at the cars went from first start straight to a set of rollers where the test tech mashed the throttle down to the floor and accelerated the vehicle up to high speed. Even earlier in the process, when the engine was assembled and sent to a dyno, again, the engines were tested at high throttle loads almost immediately.
    Last edited by Nessism; 03-09-2020 at 08:06 AM.

  5. #15
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    Take it for what its worth...as with everything else in life.
    MY BIKES..1977 GS 750 B, 1978 GS 1000 C (X2)
    1978 GS 1000 E, 1979 GS 1000 S, 1973 Yamaha TX 750, 1977 Kawasaki KZ 650B1, 1975 Honda GL1000 Goldwing, 1983 CB 650SC Nighthawk, 1972 Honda CB 350K4, 74 Honda CB550

    NEVER SNEAK UP ON A SLEEPING DOG..NOT EVEN YOUR OWN.


    I would rather trust my bike to a "QUACK" that KNOWS how to fix it rather than a book worm that THINKS HE KNOWS how to fix it.

  6. #16
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    When i bought my 81 gs1100 i asked the dealer that same question. His advice: break it in the way youre gonna ride it. I did, without getting crazy on it, and never had any engine trouble for about 25k miles, when the clutch started slipping. After putting new plates in it, it ran great for several thousand more miles, till i wrecked it. Don't know what happened to it after that, but the engine was still running while stuck in the side of that d**m Chrysler.
    Expecting the Spanish Inquisition
    1981 GS850G: the Ratzuki
    1981 Yamaha SR500
    1981 GS1100E

  7. #17
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    I broke in my bikes with high load in varying RPM INCLUDING hard decels. I often go up and down the mountains working the engine up and braking with the engine down. It's really your comfort level on how you want to run the bike. My T120 had 2 miles on it when I bought it... I rode it home via the highway and than spent 3 days going up and down the mountains. On the third day (500/600 miles) I was going to redline. The transmission did go at 20K miles but the engine it's self throws very strong compression numbers even at 46K miles... Bike will be 2 years old on April 27th.

    Honestly Norm it's a Yamaha it's going to run good no matter what you do to it!!

    Cheers.
    Jedz Moto
    2016 Yamaha FJ-09 Tracer - Fazer 900 The Mule
    2018 Triumph Bonneville T120-
    2020 Honda Monkey Z125 - Back road discoverer
    1996 BMW R1100R
    1996 Harley Davidson Sportster XL1200 - The Freedom Eagle
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hayabuser
    Cool is defined differently by different people... I'm sure the new rider down the block thinks his Ninja 250 is cool and why shouldn't he? Bikes are just cool.


  8. #18
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    I was able to get out and enjoy the nice weather we had yesterday. I took Larry's advice to "ride it like I stole it". It was reassuring knowing Larry would pay for the speeding ticket if I had gotten one! (You didn't know that did you Larr)😲 Actually, I didn't hammer it to hard, I did run it through the rpm range on several occasions though. After my 240 mile ride, I let the engine cool a little, then I changed the oil (388 miles). I'll change the oil again at 1,000 miles and call it good. 👍
    My Motorcycles:
    21 Triumph Tiger 900 GT (coming to a town near you)
    16 Yamaha FJR1300 (Probably been to a town near you)
    82 1100e Drag Bike (needs race engine)
    81 1100e Street Bike (with race engine)
    79 1000e (all original)
    82 850g (all original)
    82 750e (parts Bike)
    80 KZ650f (needs restored)

  9. #19
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    I agree with Chucks link and Nessim. 3 of my tech's who went on to work with Polaris and a major race team back that up and also mentioned high rpm decels and proper cool downs afterwards.
    Current Rides: 82 GS1100E, 00 Triumph 955 Speed Triple, 03 Kawasaki ZRX1200, 01 Honda GL1800, '15 Kawasaki 1000 Versys
    Past Rides: 72 Honda SL-125, Kawasaki KE-175, 77 GS750 with total yosh stage 1 kit, 79 GS1000s, 80 GS1000S, 82 GS750e,82 GS1000S, 84 VF500f, 86 FZR600, 95 Triumph Sprint 900,96 Triumph Sprint, 97 Triumph Sprint, 01 Kawasaki ZRX1200, 07 Triumph Tiger 1050, 01 Yam YFZ250F
    Work in progress: 78 GS1000, unknown year GS1100ES

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by limeex2 View Post
    I agree with Chucks link and Nessim. 3 of my tech's who went on to work with Polaris and a major race team back that up and also mentioned high rpm decels and proper cool downs afterwards.
    Yes Im replying to an older thread. I didn't read the above links but have read the same years/decades ago. The reason for the immediate up and down revs is you have a one time opportunity to seat the rings and that time is right after you start your new engine. The load on the rings forces them into the cylinder surface and seats them immediately. This opportunity is gone when an engine is babied. I grew up being told to drive like your on thin ice for 800 plus miles. So I do a second and third gear romp- not to redline line- then take it home and shut it down.

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