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Thread: Labor day ride with my son.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Redman View Post
    Sounds great ! !

    Maybe might be good exercise to have him stand there over the 850 and lean it over some, one way, then the other.. to get a feel for just how far over he can hold it up. Maybe even practice lowering it down on purpose, since it could happen.
    I dont mean to be negative/pessimistic.. but....

    We all do expect a good report, and some pictures.
    Wow, I fiddled with that last post for twenty minutes, LOL.

    That's not a bad idea. The Vetter stuff keeps the bike from touchiing the ground if it does go over. Say, I could lay some cardboard down and even lay it over gently and show him how to pick it up.
    Roger

    1983 GS 850G
    2003 FJR 1300A



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    Quote Originally Posted by Burque73 View Post
    Those are great pics Steve. Between all of our children and grandchildren and in our family we have five MC riders, myself included. I'd include my wife, but she gave it up and happily rides pillion. Maybe someday we'll all get a "portrait" too.
    If we included all the kids, we would have enough for a small "gang".
    Older sister has two kids from a previous marriage. Son has is own bike, daughter will happily ride behind step-dad.
    Her husband has a son from a previous marriage. He also rides.

    My wife and I have two sons. Both have bikes and ride.

    Middle sister and her husband have no children.

    Baby sister has no children, her husband has a son from a previous marriage. He also rides.

    Add them up, that's 12 bikes.


    Quote Originally Posted by Burque73 View Post
    Wow, I fiddled with that last post for twenty minutes, LOL.

    That's not a bad idea. The Vetter stuff keeps the bike from touchiing the ground if it does go over. Say, I could lay some cardboard down and even lay it over gently and show him how to pick it up.
    You can use cardboard or some old blankets, or even do it on some grass, if you have any.

    If you want to make the exercise a bit more "challenging", remove the saddlebags. That will let the bike go virtually flat on its side, making it harder to pick up. Just be sure that YOU know the proper technique to pick up the bike, so you can show him.

    Here are a couple of videos:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uX45-rbmDaM

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnu6YxMJIhU

    .

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    Sounds like a good time. Enjoy.

    When consulting the magic 8 ball for advice, one must first ask it "will your answers be accurate?"

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    I fanally have some time to update this thread. We finished rounding up our gear and set out for Northern NM on Friday morning. As I'm scrambling around the house and garage grabbing this and that trying to get ready, my son straps his backpacking gear to the GS and patiently waits for me.



    We kept his load as light as possible putting food, water, tools and heavy gear on the FJR.

    We took it easy for a while until he got used to the added weight on the bike, which didn't take long. He showed great control stopping, starting out and at low speeds. If he handled those well then heading down the road would be no problem. I warned him of high crosswinds and how the added gear on the back could make it difficult to control the bike, especially if he's leaning into the wind and a hill or big truck suddenly block the wind. Still, he and I are confident he can handle this and we roll out of town. About two miles into it he secured that blue matt a bit better.

    We got behind a line of trucks and RV's, most pulling side-by-sides, and it was slow going for 30 miles until they thinned out. We made or first stop in Cuba for a quick snack. I noticed a couple of drips of oil from the stator cover on the GS and got concerned. I checked to make sure none of the bolts worked loose and figured we'd just keep an eye on it. I really don't think it's the stator cover leaking, but will investigate later. This put enough doubt in my mind to rethink our route though.

    We were planning on heading through some pretty desolate area, but I now thought it best to stay on a more traveled highway should we need help or a quart of oil. Yeah, I forgot to bring oil. A few thousand miles on the FJR and I already forgot the joys of running a 40 year old bike. LOL

    Instead of heading to El Vado lake we decided to go to Navajo lake, up on the Colorado border. We hadn't been there in years and it was always an enjoyable spot. Another thing I forgot about the GS is that it needs gas every two hundred miles or so. We're motoring along chatting over the headsets and my son says, so, how far can I go if the needle is in the red? What? Oh crap! The FJR stil has a half tank. He switched to reserve and we hit a gas station within 25 miles. After fueling we checked and the oil level was just fine. I still only noticed one drip in a fifteen minute stop. Note to self, grab a small length of hose in case we need to siphon gas from one bike to another.

    We passed through Bloomfield and headed West toward Navajo lake. We got so caught up in the scenery we missed the sign for the lake. Pretty soon the trees got taller and the air got a bit cooler. Uh oh! This is feeling more like Colorado, I thought. Well not Colorado but close. We passed the turn to the lake by 30 miles. No worries, it's still only 4pm so there's plenty of time to grab a spot and set up before dark. We were prepared to just grab an undeveloped spot somewhere close to the lake, but decided to try the developed campground right on the lake. Well, NM state parks are still closed for Covid season, so we'll have to count on my GPS to take us to the spot we picked out. I really need to get a Garmin or something. The phone's GPS has been doing some really weird things.

    Here's the spot we picked from the satellite image at our gas stop earlier. There are oil rigs everywhere in this area and the dirt roads are well kept. I knew it'd be risky with heavy bikes (and a new rider), but he has ridden a couple of dirt bikes before, not to mention the KLR 650 so we took the chance. The road was very hard packed dirt at first with ruts going down the center, which were easy enough to aviod. Getting closer to the spot, the road had more loose gravel on it. Still doing fine we moved along in first and second gear until we arrived.

    Apparently we were'nt the only ones who had this idea. To our surprize there were what seemed to be dozens of people there. We unloaded the camp chairs and tore into the food rations. Sitting next to the bikes we ate our pasta with red sauce, peanut butter on crackers and powdered tropical punch from the MRE's. Yum!

    After some grub, we scouted out a spot away from the party crowd. It was way too gnarly for the bikes to ride down so we packed everything a half mile or so to the site and setup camp. We left most of the water we brought back at the bikes to lighten our loads since In my son's backpacking gear was a water filter that makes river and lake water safe to drink. What we didn't realize is how long it took to get even a 16oz bottle filled...

    We had a great first day and spent en equally enjoyable evening under the stars. This certainly wasn't how I taught him to start a caampfire, but it was very efficient.



    I'll write more in another post.
    Roger

    1983 GS 850G
    2003 FJR 1300A



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    Hey Roger,

    Nice write up!

    Yes, our kids (I have a 30 & 25 year old) are always waiting on us...they are so much smarter than we ever were! (I say that facetiously)

    You've learned a thing or two during your travels...like engine oil & a tube to siphon gas from one bike to another. Oh, you have to brush up on your "fire-starter" techniques! lol

    I can't imagine doing an over-nighter/wknd camp trip on a bike...but reading/watching lets me live it through your eyes.

    Time to evaluate your GS...seems that leak preoccupied your mind.

    Thanks for the story and pics.

    Ed

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    On Saturday morning I hiked back up to the bikes to check on them and grab more water. Here's a sunrise shot of where we parked.




    After hiking back down and grabbing a bite for breakfast, we got the poles out and caught a couple of smallmouth bass and northern pike. Fishing became pointless because of boat traffic and kids swimming with their dogs near that spot, so we reeled in the lines and went back to camp. As more ATV and watercraft operators came to life the lake and shoreline were buzzing with activity. It wasn't long before we got the map out to look down the road.

    Loading up the tents and cleaning up the camp site didn't take long, but the hike back up the hill was another story. By now it was after noon and getting pretty hot out there so hiking up the rocky path was exhausting. He had his backpack, but I was carrying the expanded tank bag in one hand and a saddle bag liner in the other. To our delight, one of the side by sides came crawling up the hill and offered a ride to the top. This happened to be the owner of the dog that swam by us earlier ending the fishing in that spot. We gladly accepted his offer and it turned a dreaded hot hike into a quick (but bumpy) ride!

    Still waffling about heading up to Durango, Colorado or going to another lake, we decided to head to nearby Dulce, NM and eat. Here are a couple of shots from Dulce.





    Not much to this town. In fact, it seemed like something from a Steven King story. Maybe a virus wiped out the population and we were the only living souls in the place. Oh wait, that probably actually happened...

    After gas and lunch, I grabbed a quick photo for the weely pic game and we headed toward Chama. We both agreed that riding was way more fun than camping, fishing, hiking or watching jet skis fly by on the lake.

    Passing through Chama it was actually quite chilly. The scenery is gorgeuos along hwy 64 and hwy 85 in that area. We thoruoghly enjoyed riding through there. Our plan was to head to a privately owned campground near El Vado lake and spend the night. Saturday we'd fish the lake and nearby Chama river for rainbow trout. Well, another gravel road, this worse than the last. Getting to the campground was tricky, but we did it ok. Unfortunately the place was full, crowded in fact. Ugh! Back on the bikes to find a spot before dark.

    As we rode in the dwindling sunlight we stopped in Tierra Amarilla to look at the map and agreed that heading home sounded like the best option. Albuquerque was about 2.5 hours away so we headed toward home. Still, really enjoying the ride and the fact that we can share the experience together.

    HWY 85 follows along the Chama River (Rio Chama). Here's a shot of one of our stops along that road.



    The light faded pretty quickly on us and the last stretch was in the dark. He followed me since the FJR has such a good headlight compared to the flashlight on the GS. Night riding didn't make him uncomfortable at all. We pulled into the garage a little after 10pm and were glad to be home.

    Here's the route we took.

    Labor Day ride 2020 by Roger, on Flickr

    We won't soon forget this one.
    Last edited by Burque73; 09-07-2020 at 03:32 PM.
    Roger

    1983 GS 850G
    2003 FJR 1300A



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    Roger,

    this reminds me of a 240 mile ride with MrBill near his home in Las Cruces in May 2014 (Gila Forest). Area pictures you provided are very similar to the southern region of New Mexico.

    Thanks for the update.

    Ed

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    The fact that you infer my non-acceptance is what I'm talking about. (31Jan2021)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Burque73 View Post
    ...


    ...

    Very nice, and sure makes me miss NM.

    Been all through those roads at one time or another, and have taken a lot of pics from that exact overlook.

    Glad you and your son got to do that, sounds like a great time.
    Rich Desmond
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    Sounds like a very fun and eventful weekend.

    Cowboy Up or Quit. - Run Free Lou and Rest in Peace

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    Glad you had a good trip and some time with your son. Double win! Nice pics as usual.

    When consulting the magic 8 ball for advice, one must first ask it "will your answers be accurate?"

    Glen
    -85 1150 es - Plus size supermodel.
    -Rusty old scooter.
    Other things I like to photograph.....instagram.com/gs_junkie
    https://www.flickr.com/photos/152267...7713345317771/

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