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Thread: Cam Degreeing or not

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by gs11ezrydr View Post
    New..never been installed.. And thanks to all for the insight, I have a degree wheel,dial indicator,base and stand,piston stops,etc.I,m satisfied it's worth the time and money.
    Oh nice dude. Sounds like you've got everything you need
    1979 GS850G, currently being rebuilt from the frame up. We shall see how that go's

    "The two most powerful warriors are patience and time" - Leo Tolstoy

    " Be yourself, everyone else is already taken" - Oscar Wilde

    "Do things for people not because of who they are or what they do in return, but because of who you are" - Harold S. Kushner

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by RustyTank View Post

    That said, it may be worth it for you to call Web Cam and ask them directly. I recently purchased a used set of Web Cam brand Street Cams for my bike and wanted to make sure I knew what the manufacturer recommended, so I gave them a call. My cams are considered by Web Cam to be 'Bolt In' cams, which means, from their perspective the cams don't need to be degreed. In other words they can be installed like stock cams and should work just fine.
    I have to say that drop in cams refers to the fact that the the lift is such that the head does not need any clearance work around the bucket bores or cam cover for the cams to be "dropped straight in" and rotate freely .
    They still need to be degreed in to achieve the exact listed timing specs.
    Non drop in cams have lift that is so increased over stock that they won't rotate without the lobes hitting the head casting and clearance work is required.
    Last edited by zed1015; 02-24-2021 at 05:55 AM.
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  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by zed1015 View Post
    I have to say that drop in cams refers to the fact that the the lift is such that the head does not need any clearance work around the bucket bores or cam cover for the cams to be "dropped straight in" and rotate freely .
    They still need to be degreed in to achieve the exact listed timing specs.
    Non drop in cams have lift that is so increased over stock that they won't rotate without the lobes hitting the head casting and clearance work is required.
    Man, that is such good information. Thank you zed.

    Can you, or someone else, suggest a cam degree kit? This question may be worth a post of it's own.

    Sorry gs11ezrydr, I don't mean to hijack your thread
    Last edited by RustyTank; 02-24-2021 at 10:12 AM.
    1979 GS850G, currently being rebuilt from the frame up. We shall see how that go's

    "The two most powerful warriors are patience and time" - Leo Tolstoy

    " Be yourself, everyone else is already taken" - Oscar Wilde

    "Do things for people not because of who they are or what they do in return, but because of who you are" - Harold S. Kushner

  4. #14
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    Do you know what you want? Cam timing changes things quite a bit. Some settings will give more torque, (lower rpm power) and other settings give more max HP but at a higher rpm. Stock settings are usually kind'f in the middle.
    1983 GS1100E, 1983 CB1100F, 1991 GSX1100G, 1996 Kaw. ZL600 Eliminator, 1999 Bandit 1200S, 2005 Bandit 1200S, 2000 Kaw. ZRX 1100

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by rphillips View Post
    Do you know what you want? Cam timing changes things quite a bit. Some settings will give more torque, (lower rpm power) and other settings give more max HP but at a higher rpm. Stock settings are usually kind'f in the middle.
    How does one go about finding the settings for what they want?
    1979 GS850G, currently being rebuilt from the frame up. We shall see how that go's

    "The two most powerful warriors are patience and time" - Leo Tolstoy

    " Be yourself, everyone else is already taken" - Oscar Wilde

    "Do things for people not because of who they are or what they do in return, but because of who you are" - Harold S. Kushner

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by RustyTank View Post
    Man, that is such good information. Thank you zed.

    Can you, or someone else, suggest a cam degree kit? This question may be worth a post of it's own.
    Nobody does a complete kit as such because mounting on each engine is different..
    Common items are a Degree disc and a dial indicator .
    You will need to make up a suitable head mount for the dial indicator and a pointer that bolts to the ign housing for the degree wheel.
    Timing figures are usually included when you buy the cams or most can be found online with a bit of searching.
    if you do have a set of cams with no known settings you can either set them up between centres and work out the lift and duration then compare them to the closest known cams with similar figures and use their settings or set them up at the stock cam degrees which is usually around 110 degrees as a base line and go from there.
    Mikuni Viton Choke Plunger Seat Renewal.
    VITON Choke plunger seals .KAWASAKI Z1,Z900,Z650,Z1000,Z1R,SUZUKI GS1000,GSXR,RF | eBay

    Air Corrector Jets for Mikuni VM 24, 26 and 28mm carbs .

    https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/254380193...84.m1555.l2649




  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by zed1015 View Post
    Nobody does a complete kit as such because mounting on each engine is different..
    Common items are a Degree disc and a dial indicator .
    You will need to make up a suitable head mount for the dial indicator and a pointer that bolts to the ign housing for the degree wheel.
    Timing figures are usually included when you buy the cams or most can be found online with a bit of searching.
    if you do have a set of cams with no known settings you can either set them up between centres and work out the lift and duration then compare them to the closest known cams with similar figures and use their settings or set them up at the stock cam degrees which is usually around 110 degrees as a base line and go from there.
    Thanks much for the info zed. I've got a lot to learn in regard to this.
    1979 GS850G, currently being rebuilt from the frame up. We shall see how that go's

    "The two most powerful warriors are patience and time" - Leo Tolstoy

    " Be yourself, everyone else is already taken" - Oscar Wilde

    "Do things for people not because of who they are or what they do in return, but because of who you are" - Harold S. Kushner

  8. #18
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    Dec 2019
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    Portland, Oregon
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    I've used stands like these in the past for cam degreeing, to hold the dial indicator: https://www.mcmaster.com/dial-indica...or-holders-10/

    (Of course you need to make sure it's attached to a nearby ferrous piece of metal ...). Or you can fab your own, and find a good attachment point on the head.

    A piece of welding rod works well for a degree wheel pointer. Use a set of needlenose pliers to make a loop, then bolt it to the side of your cases with a sidecover screw. Bend the rod to point where it needs to point.

    You can make a piston stop pretty easily with an old spark plug; shatter the ceramic, cut off the electrode, and press in a piece of aluminum (round off the tip!) or delrin to contact the piston.

    In my experience setup for degreeing cams is a big part of the job! Once you're set up things go pretty smoothly.

    Fingers crossed for you!

  9. #19
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    On my 16V GS1100E, lower LC #'s meant more torque (lower rpm power) & lower max HP. Higher LC #'s brought more max HP at higher rpm, but with less lower rpm power. I love torque, mine 16V GS1100E I set the cams at 107 LC for intake & 109 LC for exhaust. I don't have a clue if all engines work that way.
    1983 GS1100E, 1983 CB1100F, 1991 GSX1100G, 1996 Kaw. ZL600 Eliminator, 1999 Bandit 1200S, 2005 Bandit 1200S, 2000 Kaw. ZRX 1100

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by RustyTank View Post
    How does one go about finding the settings for what they want?
    Do you like top speed or like to just get to speed quick, I would say the higher horsepower at a high rpm is just one of those great peaks and the torque makes it great for fooling around, and also probably better if you live in a well populated area.
    Ian

    1982 GS650GLZ

    Want a "twin" for my bike

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