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Thread: Cam Degreeing or not

  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec 2012
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    Stillwater, Mn.
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    One could assume that differences in cam timing is one of the reasons 2 of the same model bikes are faster or slower than each other.
    Current Rides: 82 GS1100E, 00 Triumph 955 Speed Triple, 03 Kawasaki ZRX1200, 01 Honda GL1800, '15 Kawasaki 1000 Versys
    Past Rides: 72 Honda SL-125, Kawasaki KE-175, 77 GS750 with total yosh stage 1 kit, 79 GS1000s, 80 GS1000S, 82 GS750e,82 GS1000S, 84 VF500f, 86 FZR600, 95 Triumph Sprint 900,96 Triumph Sprint, 97 Triumph Sprint, 01 Kawasaki ZRX1200, 07 Triumph Tiger 1050, 01 Yam YFZ250F
    Work in progress: 78 GS1000, unknown year GS1100ES

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Oct 2020
    Location
    UK .
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    Quote Originally Posted by limeex2 View Post
    One could assume that differences in cam timing is one of the reasons 2 of the same model bikes are faster or slower than each other.
    Production tolerances can affect the performance slightly between machines coming off the production line but it would hardly be noticeable.
    If one slipped through quality control with noticeably less power we'd call that a Friday afternoon or Monday morning job ..
    After that wear and mileage etc would be more of a factor.
    If you get a stock motor though and degree the cams in to spec it can sharpen the performance up a bit depending on can chain wear etc..
    Last edited by zed1015; 03-21-2021 at 12:55 PM.
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  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar 2013
    Location
    South Central Kentucky
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    Quote Originally Posted by limeex2 View Post
    One could assume that differences in cam timing is one of the reasons 2 of the same model bikes are faster or slower than each other.
    I could agree. Back in the early 80's at one time we uncrated and assembled as many as seven 1100's in a day and there was a few that were faster and slower after break-in.A few customers complained about the issue..But cam timing if food for thought there..Along with clearances,tolerances,etc.
    82 gs1100ez 1168 Wiseco,Web .348 Cams,Falicon Sprockets,Star Racing Ported Head,1mm o/s Stainless Valves,APE Springs,Bronze Guides,etc.APE Billet Tensioner,36CV Carbs,Stage 3 Dynojet,Plenum w/K&N filter,Trued,Welded,Balanced,Crank w/Katana rods & Billet left end, FBG backcut trans, VHR HD Clutch basket,APE nut,VHR High volume oil pump gears,1150 Oil cooler,V&H Megaphone header w/Competition baffle,Dyna S,Coils,Wires,etc.Other misc.mods.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
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    2,443

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    There is a lot of good info on this thread. Here is my take on the subject. Cam timing is a lot like jetting. If it is close it works, but.... Having it down cold and near perfect makes a big difference in the way an engine runs. You can dial in top end power, or midrange power with the same setup. Advancing favors bottom end power, retard favors top end power. Changing cam timing from stock alters valve to piston clearance keep an eye on that. Any wear in the, chain, cams, sprockets, or chain guides can alter timing. Then add machining imperfections to the mix. It is only hard until you do it, when you learn how to do it opens a window, and you become a more professional better engine builder without a doubt. Learn how from tech support at cam manufacturers support websites.
    1981 GS1100E
    1982 GS1100E



    "It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it." Aristotle


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