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Thread: 2014 Triumph Street Triple 675

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    11

    Default 2014 Triumph Street Triple 675

    I just got this bike last week and love it. It's really light, with a ton of usable torque and unique sound from the triple cylinder 675, and it comes stock with fully adjustable (compression, rebound, preload) front and rear suspension. Once I had a bike with properly fitting and adjusted suspension I don't think I can ever go back.

    Anyway, this isn't a "project bike" but I did buy it with a known leak: Triumph bikes from this era are known to have leaking countershaft seals, so that's what I'm working on at the moment. Removing the old seal was pretty easy - I drilled a small hole through it, inserted a coarse thread screw, and pulled it out with vise grips.

    Getting the new seal in, on the other hand, is not as easy. All the videos I see seem to have enough clearance (well, less interference) to push the new seal in by hand. I wasn't able to the first time around, and buggered up the new seal a little as I tapped it in. I was expecting this and bought 2. I have family visiting so right now the bike is on the stand, rear wheel and sprocket cover off, and leaking seal ready to be pulled.

    If anyone has any tips how to get a new lip seal started in a tight gland/housing, I'd love to hear them!


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Location
    Mission Viejo, CA
    Posts
    654

    Default

    Love a triple. Rode a big Tiger for a day, great feel to it. No real clue as to your question, but is it a metal to metal fit possibly? If so perhaps freezing the seal and warming the area with a heat gun as is done for such things as bearings?
    Tom

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    11

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    I had a Sprint 955 triple for a short time - the sound, torque, and power were pretty unreal!

    The seal is rubber coated metal. I thought about freezing the seal and heating the case with a heat gun but figured I'd ask around a little first.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Wellington, near Cape Town, South Africa
    Posts
    756

    Default

    Here is a link to a thread on the Triumph 675 forum on how to replace the countershaft seal. It was recommended to use an industrial grade seal which is 7 mm thick, instead of the OEM seal which is 5 mm thick. The details of the replacement seal are given in the thread.

    My son has a 2007 Daytona 675 which luckily has not leaked there yet. Enjoy your Striple!

    How To: Replace Counter Sprocket Seal | Triumph 675 Forums
    1981 GS850G "Blue Magic" (Photo of the Month Winner April 2009)

    1981 GS1000G "Leo"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Location
    Branson, MO
    Posts
    3,316

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    Use the corner off a plastic baggie over the machined part of the shaft to act as a protector then slip the new seal on over that and pull off the plastic once the seal is on the smooth part of the shaft..

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2021
    Location
    Honolulu, HI
    Posts
    11

    Default

    Idk what happened to my last post? Anyway I found I had to chamfer the engine case a little, as I couldn't get a new seal started without damaging the rubber. The engine was designed to have the seal installed on the shaft before assembling the engine halves, so there's no lead-in chamfer on the case. I got it started, but then realized I should have a double-lip seal since a lot of junk collects under the sprocket cover. I received the wrong material, so now have to wait (again) for the right material seal to get here. Hopefully I'll get it running this weekend. It really sucks having a new (to me) bike I can't ride!

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