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Thread: Pits in paint

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2017
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    Default Pits in paint

    I have a maroon 78 GS 1000 that has many small pits in the tank paint. Is there any way to disguise/cover up the flaws without repainting? Does anyone know the code for this maroon paint color? Thanks
    1978 GS 1000

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    New York City
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    You've tried polishing compound? Rubbing compound?
    1982 GS1100E V&H "SS" exhaust, APE pods, 1150 oil cooler, 140 speedo, 99.3 rear wheel HP, black engine, '83 red

    2016 XL883L Two-tone blue and white. Almost 42 hp! Status: destroyed, now owned by the insurance company. The hole in my memory starts an hour before the accident and ends 24 hours after.

  3. #3
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    The pits are to the bare metal. I did buy a Meguiar's polish that really helped the oxidation but the pits are to the metal.
    1978 GS 1000

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
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    Toronto Ontario
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kingjoel View Post
    The pits are to the bare metal. I did buy a Meguiar's polish that really helped the oxidation but the pits are to the metal.
    A WAx that dries clear will at least in hibit rust
    My old girl has em. They are a factor of mileage speed and average road debris.
    1983 GS 550 LD
    2009 BMW K1300s

  5. #5
    Gorminrider is offline Forum Sage Past Site Supporter
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    the Quicky:failing a match in the little touch-up bottles available in the automotive paint section, look at NailPolish. Comes in every colour especially reds/maroons. Has a brush inside OR use a matchstick or cut a q-tip head off and use the cardboard stick to "touch" the pits without a mess all round. Nail polish is thick and often dries "proud" of the original surface using the brush (but can be thinned)
    Enamel is also an option and is easy to work with
    Model Paints come in every colour but test! for reaction on your 1980s coating...
    spray paints can be shot into very clean tin cans but do it outdoors, remove the fancy spray nozzle if it has one or replace the nozzle with the long tube you find on a can of wd40

    or instead of nail polish or "touch-up bottle, Spray-can laquers: small amounts: to shoot a spray can into a tall clean tin can...outdoors! at arm's length! remove the spray nozzle and replace the long tube from a wd40 can or it's like , with a rag overall to stop spray escape! work fast!
    But again test! for reaction on your 1980s coating...

    all of these will have a "margin" where they meet the original finish. it's up to you how far you want to go attempting to disguise it. (if it's good at 10 feet, quit is probably the best advice) Buffing compounds come in "grades" ...a bit on a cloth rubbed with your finger should do it but use masking tape to control the buffing area or you'll end up with a 6" patch around every tiny pit.
    Last edited by Gorminrider; 04-15-2021 at 11:57 AM.

  6. #6
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    I use nail polish a lot for touch up on cars & bikes. You can even blend your own color, and they do have clear. You can lightly wet sand it when it is dry. Use 600 then 1000 grit, the rubbing compound, then polish. Fingernail polish is lacquer it dries fast, if you need thinner use lacquer thinner. Otherwise it is paint time, and that is a pain in the arse.
    1981 GS1100E
    1982 GS1100E



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