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Thread: 83 1100E oil 0/W 50W synthetic

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    Quote Originally Posted by phydeauxmutt View Post
    Synthetic oil does not cause leaks. It may scrub away the crud that is plugging an existing leak, making you think it causes a leak. It will be up to you whether you repair the cause of the leak or go back to an oil that will plug the leak.

    Synthetic oil is not "slipperier" than 'conventional' oil. It will not make your clutch slip. For the most part, oil is oil. Just choose the correct viscosity.

    There are some properties of synthetic where it tolerates heat better or will resist wear due to shear or other stuff, and can usually last a bit longer between changes.
    Agree. Main attribute with synthetic oil is that it breaks down slower thus you can use it longer. Because it lasts longer the oil makers put more detergent and acid buffers in it. Pretty much every new turbo auto engine being built these days is using synthetic oil and they don't leak.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nessism View Post
    Pretty much every new turbo auto engine being built these days is using synthetic oil and they don't leak.
    Not only that, but they put the synthetic oil in at the factory, further dispelling the myth that you need to use 'regular' oil to break it in, then you can switch to synthetic.

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    Quote Originally Posted by phydeauxmutt View Post
    Synthetic oil does not cause leaks.
    Agreed. I recall being told that it 'found' leaks. From day one with my Suzi (2013), it has been 'money is no object' when it comes to her care. Much like tubes vs. tubeless, I shied away from synthetic because it can be argued that she was not designed for synth.

    But the bottom line is she already 'sweats horsepower' a wee bit (occasional drop on the floor), so I never fed her synth. But my 2016 Sportster never got anything but full synth.

    A few years back, I was talking cars with a real old timer. When I asked him what was the main improvement from the olden days, he said it was the quality of the oil, particularly it's longevity.

    Back in the '70's and '80's, ('71 CB350 & '73 Z1), I pretty much stuck to Castrol GTX 20w-50.
    1982 GS1100E V&H "SS" exhaust, APE pods, 1150 oil cooler, 140 speedo, 99.3 rear wheel HP, black engine, '83 red

    2016 XL883L Two-tone blue and white. Almost 42 hp! Status: destroyed, now owned by the insurance company. The hole in my memory starts an hour before the accident and ends 24 hours after.

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    I believe I read or was told manufacturer's can run tighter tolerances with synthetics due to synthetic oil molecules being all the same "size" as compared to conventional oils which are of many different sizes.
    Current Rides: 82 GS1100E, 00 Triumph 955 Speed Triple, 03 Kawasaki ZRX1200, 01 Honda GL1800, '15 Kawasaki 1000 Versys
    Past Rides: 72 Honda SL-125, Kawasaki KE-175, 77 GS750 with total yosh stage 1 kit, 79 GS1000s, 80 GS1000S, 82 GS750e,82 GS1000S, 84 VF500f, 86 FZR600, 95 Triumph Sprint 900,96 Triumph Sprint, 97 Triumph Sprint, 01 Kawasaki ZRX1200, 07 Triumph Tiger 1050, 01 Yam YFZ250F
    Work in progress: 78 GS1000, unknown year GS1100ES

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    Quote Originally Posted by limeex2 View Post
    I believe I read or was told manufacturer's can run tighter tolerances with synthetics due to synthetic oil molecules being all the same "size" as compared to conventional oils which are of many different sizes.

    That's a good point,thanks.

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    Quote Originally Posted by limeex2 View Post
    I believe I read or was told manufacturer's can run tighter tolerances with synthetics due to synthetic oil molecules being all the same "size" as compared to conventional oils which are of many different sizes.
    Incorrect. Whoever told you that doesn't know very much about bearing design.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob S. View Post
    Back in the '70's and '80's, ..., I pretty much stuck to Castrol GTX 20w-50.
    Not a 'bad' oil, and the higher viscosity is great for generating pressure. Just remember that it's not pressure that lubricates the engine, it's volume.

    Imagine for a moment if the oil passage just downstream of the pump and the sending unit for the pressure gauge was completely blocked. The reading on the gauge would be sky-high, but there would be NOTHING flowing through the bearings. It is far better to have an oil that is thin enough to flow through the thin clearances of the bearings. Fortunately, most GSes have roller bearings on the crank, but still have plain bearings on the cams.

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