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Thread: Broken Clutch Cable Anchor on the Cranckase

  1. #1
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    Default Broken Clutch Cable Anchor on the Cranckase

    This question was asked in 2014 however the thread needed a picture and was never uploaded. I also have the same problem and have heard that it is not uncommon on Japanese bikes. Half of the threaded anchor is broken away from the clutch anchor however the cable is still in the bracket. I loosened the lock nut and the cable did not move, I am assuming that someone epoxied it in place. Can anyone recommend a repair process that will be more secure than glue? The bike is in a rebuilding process at this time however I am not anxious to open up the motor. It is running good at this time.

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    A good TIG welder can build the housing back up around a steel bolt put in where the cable goes. 8 X 1.25mm thread.
    If he's really good you won't even have to put a tap through it afterwards. Just recut the cable slot.

    The cases on our racebike GS1000 engine had a previous life as a turbo engine. To make room for the turbo, the clutch cable perch had been cut off.
    I made up a bolt on stainless piece to replace it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by GregT View Post
    A good TIG welder can build the housing back up around a steel bolt put in where the cable goes. 8 X 1.25mm thread.
    If he's really good you won't even have to put a tap through it afterwards. Just recut the cable slot.

    The cases on our racebike GS1000 engine had a previous life as a turbo engine. To make room for the turbo, the clutch cable perch had been cut off.
    I made up a bolt on stainless piece to replace it.
    I had thought that welding on to the anchor would be an option however I did not consider having a bolt in the original threads to form a pattern. Good idea. Did you use a stainless steel bolt? What are you referring to by "I made up a stainless piece to replace it"?
    Do not ride faster than your angel can fly
    2016 K1600GL BMW
    1983 Honda CB1000c
    1983 Suzuki GS1100E recent purchase

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    I could envision making a bracket to perform the same function that's located by two of the clutch cover bolts and perhaps a starter cover bolt.

    Or, as mentioned above, take the carbs and tank off and trailer the bike to someone who's a decent TIG welder.
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    I removed the remains of the bracket and created a simple new bracket which i bolted onto the block using 2 m6 bolts.
    Remove the clutch cover to see what you're doing and catch aluminium while drilling.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rijko View Post
    I removed the remains of the bracket and created a simple new bracket which i bolted onto the block using 2 m6 bolts.
    Remove the clutch cover to see what you're doing and catch aluminium while drilling.
    Yes, I did ours with empty cases but covering the clutch with cloth to catch the swarf from drilling works too.
    I used three 6mm screws with nyloc nuts - and the heads are lockwired on the top.

    It was a piece of 3mm stainless plate with a machined and tapped block welded to the top.

    The TIG welder who showed me that trick of recovering threads around a bolt simply used normal steel bolts - nothing trick.

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